Sustainable transportation

Moving goods and people safely, affordably and responsively is a core responsibility of the Council - with inter-agency support. Without sustainable transport links our economy and well-being will suffer.
Shaping our transportation network wisely will underpin success in Tairāwhiti.

 The evidence - what do we already know?

Road network

» Largest local road network in New Zealand relative to its population (48,000) and ratepayer base.

» Local urban roads - 229 km

» Local rural roads - 1,624 km » State Highways - 331 km (SH 2 and SH 35) » The road network is susceptible to surface flooding, landslides and weather degradation.

» We have two main roads into the region: SH2 from Wairoa; and SH35 to Bay of Plenty via Waioeka Gorge. Both are vulnerable to road closure from slips.

» In 2016 there were 40 road closures due to flooding and landslides.

» Following the Queens Birthday storms in 2018, 630km of local roads and 29km of State Highway were closed.

» Road maintenance costs have increased in line with the intensification of heavy vehicles on the roads due to the surge in regional forestry activities.

» Coastal roads vulnerable to erosion and flooding include:

      > Makorori Road

      > the access to Waihau Bay

      > Kaiaua Beach

      > the access to Nuhiti Beach from Anaura Bay

      > Waima, Tokomaru Bay

      > beach roads at Waipiro Bay

      > the East Cape Road

» Central Government has approved a total investment of $369 million for the Tairāwhiti roading network.

log tonnage

vulnerable roads

Public transport

» Gizzy Bus service: two buses operating over six routes.

» Steady decline in Gizzy Bus patronage since 2012/13 and a steady increase in school bus patronage.

Active transport

» Cycling within the Gisborne District represents 3.3% of total commuter share.

» Council’s Urban Cycleways Programme (UCP) will build a spine of protected cycleway routes designed to separate riders from motor vehicles.

» Fourteen schools have implemented the Bikes in Schools programme (the highest number in New Zealand)

cycling commuter share

cycleway

Rail

» The Palmerston North-Gisborne Line provides a railway connection between Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay region and the North Island Main Trunk railway in Palmerston North.

» The line was closed in 2012 following several large washouts north of Wairoa resulting in significant damage to rail infrastructure.

» In early 2018 KiwiRail announced the reopening of the line between Wairoa and Napier following support from the Regional Infrastructure Growth fund.

» Up to $600k is currently available to undertake a feasibility study for re-opening the Gisborne to Wairoa section.

Sea and air

» Gisborne Airport is located 4.2 km from the city centre. The runway is night capable and 1,300m long.

» 20,066 take-offs and landings at Gisborne airport during the year to March 2018, up from 15,494 the year before.

» 170,993 passenger movements during the year to March 2018, up from 156,146 the year before.

» The Government committed $5.5 million in the redevelopment of Gisborne Airport. Total development cost: $12.5m. Remainder to be co-funded by Eastland Group Ltd and the Eastland Community Trust. 

» Eastland Port is located 800m from the city centre. It is New Zealand’s second largest log exporter and the most easterly commercial shipping port in New Zealand.

» Forestry is the main user of the Port. Raw logs represent 99% of trade out of the port by volume.

» Eastland Port exported over 3,000,000 tons of logs, kiwifruit and squash during the 2017/18 financial year, equating to over 100,000 full truck movements. With growing volumes of logs, kiwifruit and apples from the region this volume will top between 4.5 and 5 million tons by 2025.

» Eastland Port is committing $70m to a port expansion to increase berthing capacity.

» 11 cruise ship visits to Gisborne in 2016-17 added $3million to gross domestic product.

The challenges and opportunities

Challenges - if we do nothing

» The roading network will become increasingly degraded and costly to repair and maintain.

» Road closures and maintenance costs will increase for both local roads and State Highways.

» The safety of the road network will decline – leading to more likelihood of accidents.

» Heavy vehicles will continue to dominate our roads, rather than seeing an increase in other forms of transport. 

» The airport may be hemmed in by the City and unable to grow.

» Uncertainty around the future and role of rail.

» The effects of climate change will continue to impact on our transportation network.

Opportunities

Cycling and walking

> the Poverty Bay Flats 

> the Waipaoa Flood Control Scheme 

> pathway from Midway Surf Club to Waipaoa River mouth

> a regional cycle and walking trail network

> improved access across the CBD 

Road network

» Restore and maintain the condition of State Highway 35 to support safe and efficient travel along the East Coast.

» Promote an East Coast journey that expands upon the Tairāwhiti Navigations Programme to boost regional tourism. This includes enhancing key destinations, township development, signage and other design elements to form a coherent regional experience that will enhance the visitor experience and increase visitor numbers.

Sea and rail

> northern barge berth to reduce road freight in favour of coastal transport

> a northern port to support coastal shipping

> rail to take a proportion of logging freight

> rail tourism 

The questions

» Investigate and build alternative routes for sections of the road network that are more vulnerable to coastal hazards and erosion.

» We know that the movement of logging trucks through our communities to the Port is a major challenge. How can this be made more sustainable/less impactful on our roads?

» Should we consider:

      > an alternative Port location?

      > use of rail?

      > a northern port ?

      > a heavy vehicle bypass for Gisborne city?

» Should Tairawhiti consider a wider regional walking / cycle trail network?

» Where could new walking and cycling trails be located?

» How can we increase walking and cycling access through the CBD?

rail bridge

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Latest Submission
» We know that the movement of logging trucks through our communities to the Port is a major challenge. How can this be made more sustainable/less impactful on our roads? less forestry, rail

» Should we consider:

> an alternative Port location? yes

> use of rail? yes, absolutely

> a northern port ? yes

> a heavy vehicle bypass for Gisborne city? yes

» Should Tairawhiti consider a wider regional walking / cycle trail network? yes. We need tons more of these. Build them and people will come!

» Where could new walking and cycling trails be located? everywhere. Out to pouawa, out to te kuri a paoa. along the town rivers. more on titirangi.

» How can we increase walking and cycling access through the CBD? cycle lanes, less cars, car free areas.
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