Have your say - sustainable land use
Land of suitable quality and fertility for food production needs to be zoned accordingly - total waste to be covered in mansions and ride on mowed lawns. Land is needed for housing, but should not occupy food growing areas.
Need to make it easier to get consent to build dams - water is not just an issue for the city.
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The large scale spraying and burning of entire hillsides of native Kanuka needs to be regulated in this region. Untold millions of creatures go up in smoke instantly in the name of grass or pine trees, no one seems to bat an eye at this. So many birds, geckos and insects rely on these areas, it is no wonder populations are plummeting. At the very, very least it should be a rule that spraying is only allowed if there are large scrub areas nearby that can absorb some of the displaced wildlife (those that don't get incinerated). The irony is that often the subsequent erosion on the hills after scrub destruction results in more un-grazable areas due to slipping than if they had left the trees there. Often they are burning the only patch of scrub for miles, the hills are quite literally bare.
This region needs a balance of farmland and native areas for our wildlife, it needs to be regulated, at the moment it seems that people just do what they want with no thought to what they are destroying.
Please bring this up for discussion at a council meeting.
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MAP
I am submitting in support of the Community Submission addressed to the Sustainable Land Use portion of the Tairawhiti Spatial Plan, 9th June.
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What type of land uses are suitable for our steepest most erodible land? Only native forest.
Is plantation forestry in the right place? No, far too much of it on the steep and riparian land. keep it to the flats
What are the alternatives? regenerating/planting native trees
What is the cost of plantation forestry for Tairāwhiti? loss of biodiversity, poor water quality, poor roads, fatal accidents
Do we need more land protected for horticultural use?no
» How can we support the development of maori owned land? good consultation with hapu/iwi. We all have different ideas of development. Allowing native trees to regenerate is development.
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Pines do not belong on our productive farm land the blanket planting which is occurring as a result of the Government's Billion Trees incentives. Our communities will suffer, have we not learnt from the past...just look at the East Coast for example 30-40 years ago the East Coast was thriving, bustling employment rich communities, planting pines on fertile rolling country has contributed to the ghost towns which line the Coast, the state of the roads and not to mention the 'slash' situation. The 'Well-being' of our communities are under threat, a farm can employ, house, feed, nurture and educate multiple families over generations. Rural Schools rely on rural families working on farms. Forestry has its place, but its not on fertile farm land. Once a farm is planted thats it for 30 years, yes it employs people for a couple of months while it is planted, prunned then there is nothing until it is felled carted and sold, do the profits go back into the community??? No...they go off offshore. If forestry was so good for communities wouldnt they be thriving??? Instead the East Coast have some of the worse health and well-being stats in NZ!!!! I'm hoping something can be done here in Tairawhiti in regards to this. I hope its not to late!!! Rural communities is what makes this region soo unique.
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» What type of land uses are suitable for our steepest, most erodible land? Forestry plantations, but not of radiata pine. Long term/permanent native plantations could be considered to stabilise erodible land. It should be noted that recent research suggests that pine trees produce monoterpenes which prolongs the life of methane in the local atmosphere. Given that 42% of our land is taken up by pastoral farming, relying on pine should be avoided and natives planted instead wherever feasible.

» Is plantation forestry in the right place? 
> Where shouldn’t we have forestry? It should be considered that it is not simply a question of where plantation forestry should or shouldn't be, but a question of how trees are harvested and the appropriate management of slash facilitated by more stringent consents granted by the Council.

> What are the alternatives? The success of Ruatoria-based Hikurangi Cannabis Company shows that there is real potential for a hemp growing and processing industry in the Gisborne region. The favourable growing conditions and local knowledge present a real opportunity for growth that should be seriously considered for further development.
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» What is the cost of plantation forestry for Tairāwhiti? Our roads, which would be remediated by an investment in rail. Plantation forestry should be seen not as a cost but (when properly managed) as an opportunity for growth during the period of time in which central government is relying on carbon credits from planting trees (as opposed to hard mitigation strategies) to meet targets for carbon reduction in order to facilitate transition to a net zero economy. However, the regions' reliance on the primary sector, including forestry, presents the need to diversify into sectors that will be sustainable under a future low carbon economy and are less vulnerable to the risks of climate change. This submission rejects the notion suggested by the previous submitter that forestry is to blame for the decline of coastal communities and that farming is the solution to their crisis of well-being. While forestry is not the solution to their problems either, multiple national and international agencies have noted the issues surrounding the stability of farming and the need for radical change in our food production systems. The jobs of farmers or foresters should not come at the cost of the other. The conversation should be instead centred around diversification into other sectors as opposed to a politicized war between the two.
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» How can we support the development of Maori owned land? Encouraging and facilitating partnership with the Maori Carbon Foundation. A significant portion of Maori owned land is marginal and perfect for the plantation of forests for the purpose of carbon farming. This produces local jobs, financial gain to owners of under developed land, and produces carbon credits which will help NZ meet its Kyoto Protocol targets.

While it was not included in the questions, addressing the health of our waterways is also a serious issue as it relates to 'sustainable land use'. Enabling partnerships between iwi, the private sector, farmers, and community for the purposes of encouraging the plantation of riparian plants along waterways has been seen to be an effective method for improving the ecological function of rivers and streams. The latest Environment Aotearoa report uses the example of the restoration of Otukaikino Creek which the GDC could use as a model for successful restoration through partnership.
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» What type of land uses are suitable for our steepest, most erodible land? Forestry plantations, but not of radiata pine. Long term/permanent native plantations could be considered to stabilise erodible land. It should be noted that recent research suggests that pine trees produce monoterpenes which prolongs the life of methane in the local atmosphere. Given that 42% of our land is taken up by pastoral farming, relying on pine should be avoided and natives planted instead wherever feasible.

» Is plantation forestry in the right place? 
> Where shouldn’t we have forestry? It should be considered that it is not simply a question of where plantation forestry should or shouldn't be, but a question of how trees are harvested and the appropriate management of slash facilitated by more stringent consents granted by the Council.

> What are the alternatives? The success of Ruatoria-based Hikurangi Cannabis Company shows that there is real potential for a hemp growing and processing industry in the Gisborne region. The favourable growing conditions and local knowledge present a real opportunity for growth that should be seriously considered for further development.
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